Making Democracy Work

LWVUS studies 2015 (Money in Politics and Constitutional Amendment Process)

Based on members' decision at the LWVUS convention in June 2014, two committees were appointed as the first step toward League studies to update our positions on campaign finance reform and the constitutional amendment process. A national committee to study the redistricting process, in preparation for the mandated redistricting following the 2020 census, has also been appointed and includes LWVNH board member Nancy Marashio.

Money in Politics study

LWV Money in Politics study

LWV released the new position on Money In Politics in April 2016. Click here for the pdf of the new position.

2/13/17: The national LWV just released an "Action Kit" for those who wish to make a difference regarding Money in Politics. Click here to read their summaries and suggestions.

The reading list used during our 2015 study is listed below. All are pdfs, ranging from 3 to 6 pages. Options for Reforming Money in Politics

Corruption and Rationales

Hard, Soft, and Dark Money

First Amendment issues

the Supreme Court's role in money in politics

Washington Post article on Super PACS

Consensus questions Click here to read the consensus questions:

The study's goals in the study: The League will conduct an update of the League's position on campaign finance for the purpose of addressing the lack of member understanding and agreement as to whether financing a political campaign is protected speech under the First Amendment. The campaign finance position will be updated through a study and consensus process to consider: (1) the rights of individuals and organizations, under the First Amendment, to express their political views through independent expenditures and the finance of election campaign activities; and (2) how those rights, if any, should be protected and reconciled with the interests set out in the current position.

Constitutional Amendment study

The study's goals: The League will study the process by which the U.S. Constitution can be amended, including the constitutional convention method, and identify the gaps and challenges in those methods.

Consensus meetings were held in Bow and in Nashua, and the results were submitted to LWVUS, then analyzed with results from other Leagues nationwide to develop the consensus position (see below).

The national board released its official position on Constitutional Conventions in January 2016, based on the nationwide consensus results. Click here for the pdf of the position